9. Initiative and Self-Direction
Students as life-long learners are motivated to set their own goals and reflect on their progress as they grow and improve their linguistic and cultural competence.

Initiative and Self-Direction


Add your examples here. Please follow the format of the examples above. Place each example in the correct proficiency level and make sure to indicate which mode(s) the example is in.

Name
E-mail
School
City, State,
zip code
Level, Language
Novice Proficiency
Range Example
Intermediate Proficiency
Range Example
Advanced Proficiency
Range Example
Recommended Tools and Resources
Florence
Lyons
@froggieflo
Matamata
College
NZ

use of online portfolio (e-portfolio) in order to self manage and reflect on their own work and progress
idem
idem
myportfolio
Mahara
Greta Lundgaard
greta.lundgaard@pisd.edu
Plano ISD
Plano, TX 75075
all languages, all levels
As part of pre-planning for semester or year, instructor defines, district guidelines & goals & student produced models, the writing proficiency goal for the semester/year. The instructor pre-plans the writing tasks that she will not grade but provide feedback only (the writing tasks & goals are based on the end of unit/semester writing task.) The instructor shares the models & the goals with the learners. The instructor prepares a ppt presentation for each class, each slide named for each student and containing the feedback grid developed by the instructor, campus team, or district. After each of the pre-planned feedback only writing tasks, the instuctor records specific, actionable, descriptive feedback (based on district writing rubric or ACTFL Performance Guidelines) on each student's slide. In individual conferences or as a class (by printing out each slide and distributing to each student) instructor shares feedback for improving writing with each student. With each subsequent writing (feedback only), the instructor guides the students as they learn to analyze their products, determine if they have responded to previous feedback, respond to current feedback, and verbalize or write their own feedback. As students learn how to respond to feedback, recognize when they have done it or not, and then formulate good feedback for their own work, the instructor begins to lead the students in peer feedback in the same way. Learners see the cause/effect role of feedback in the products they produce. (Presentational)


ACTFL Performance Guidelines, PowerPoint or similar tool
Greta Lundgaard
greta.lundgaard@pisd.edu
Plano ISD
Plano, TX 75075
all languages, all levels
As part of the pre-planning for the semester, the instructor identifies weekly or bi-weekly "daily work" interpersonal speaking activities--starting with close ended and progressing to open ended. Learners have access to the Interpersonal speaking rubric. Record each interpersonal speaking practice, and, referring to the Interpersonal Speaking Rubric, have students swap nice headphones and listen to a conversation. For each person in the conversation, the student is to give a "Plus/Delta"=1 good thing the speaker did (based on the rubric) and 1 change the speaker needs to do in order to improve his performance next time (based on the rubric). The instructor will need to allow the students to listen to the conversation twice so that they can give a "Plus/Delta" for each person involved in the conversation. The "Plus/Delta" information is given to the specific students, read by the students, and the teacher replays the conversation again to allow each student to hear the "Plus" and the "Delta" part of the conversation. Students retain the "Plus/Delta" information so that they can note their progress or lack of progress in the "Delta" suggestions. (Interpersonal)


District Interpersonal Speaking Rubric; ACTFL Performance Guidelines; classroom instructional technology for recording/saving speaking samples